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Scots Heraldry - The Heraldry Society of Scotland

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  An Annotated Bibliography of Scottish Heraldic Materials Page 6 - compiled by Leslie A. Schweitzer & David Hunter of Montlaw.
Miscellaneous Articles

In addition to these treatises and journals, there are many articles in various periodicals and proceedings which may be of interest to the person who is studying Scottish Heraldry. A listing of several of these articles follows. Many of these articles are written in terms of legal rights and obligations, arising from the fact the Lord Lyon is a judicial officer of the Crown of Scotland, and from the fact that armorial ensigns in Scotland are a property right protected by the laws of Scotland. Annotations for these articles will not be provided, except in those cases where the article may be of particular interest to general heraldic researchers. Articles where the title is self-explanatory also will not be annotated.

Agnew of Lochnaw, Crispin, "Conflict of Heraldic Law" 1988 Juridical Review p. 61.
 

Agnew of Lochnaw, Crispin, "Peerage and Baronetcy Claims in the Lyon Court" 26 Journal of the Law Society of Scotland p. 311 (1981)

Balfour Paul, James, "Notice of Four Ancient Scottish Standards with Detailed Description of the Recently Discovered Marchmont Standard" Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland (January 14, 1918), pp. 14-60

One of two articles which contains extensive descriptions of the surviving pre-1650 Scottish standards, both as to design and as to construction. Photographs of the standards are included in this article.

Burnett, C.J., "Contacts between Scottish and English Officers" Tribute to an Armorist: Essays for John Brooke-Little to mark the Golden Jubilee of 'The Coat of Arms.' (London: The Heraldry Society, 2000), pp 36-47.

An examination of the social and official contacts between members of the heraldic offices of Scotland and England between 1370 and 1640.

Burnett, C.J., "The Export of Scottish Heraldic Symbolism" Genalogica and Heraldica: Proceedings of the 22nd International Congress of Genealogical and Heraldic Sciences in Ottawa, University of Ottawa Press, 1998 pp.339-342 (ISBN 0-7766-0472-4)

Burnett, Charles J. "Funeral Heraldry in Scotland with Particular Reference to Hatchments" Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, 116 (1986), pp. 473-559.

An extensive article on the use of heraldry in relation to funerals in Scotland. The earliest funeral so described was in 1329, and most of the funerals date to after 1600. All known Scottish hatchments are discussed in the article, and photographs of most are included.

 

Burnett, Charles J.The Use of Symbolism from the Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle on the Uniform of Scottish Regiments. Genealogica & Heralica Lisboa 1986: Actas do 17o Congresso Internacional das Ciencias Genealogica e Heraldica, Instituto Portugues de Heraldica, 1986, pp. 171-178.

Campbell, Colin, 'Scottish Arms in the Bellenville Roll', The Scottish Genealogist, vol. XXV, No. 2 (1978), pages 33-52.

 

The Scots section of the Armorial Bellenville was compiled some time before 1385 and probably before 1379 by an unknown Flemish compiler. It contains armory from south and east Scotland. It is likely that the compiler had never been to Scotland.

This article provides black and white photographs of the pages in the Armorial Bellenville with Scots arms. It also provides a discussion in which the author provides blazons and possible attributions for armory in the Roll for which the owner is not clearly given.

Clouston, J. Storer, 'The Armorial de Berry', Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland Vol. LXXII, 6th series, vol. XII, (1938) pages 84-111

 

The Armorial de Berry was compiled ca. 1445, probably by Gilles de Bouvier, who was Berry King of Arms of France from 1420. The author of the article gives a detailed discussion of the arms. Clouston supports Bouvier’s statement that he obtained information about the arms directly from the bearers. However, Clouston's analysis also indicates some cases in which it appears that Bouvier made mistakes in attribution, or made incomplete notes and attempted to recreate the armory from memory.

This article provides color photographs of the pages of the Armorial in question along with the discussion.

Note: Stodart also includes information about the Armorial de Berry.

 

Douglas, P. "Scottish Families and their symbols in the Netherlands, or the Coats of Arms of Dutch Families of Scottish Descent", Genalogica and Heraldica: Proceedings of the 22nd International Congress of Genealogical and Heraldic Sciences in Ottawa, University of Ottawa Press, 1998 pp. 111-126 (ISBN 0-7766-0472-4)

 

Hannay, R.K. "Observations on the Officers of the Scottish Parliament" 1932 Juridical Review pp. 125-138

 

"Heraldica", "Arms of Duffus of Claverhouse" Notes and Queries, February 3, 1940 pp. 74-78; February 10, 1940, pp. 93-96; February 24, 1940, pp. 131-133.

 

Innes of Learney, Thomas, "Armorial Conveyancing," Notes and Queries, February 22, 1941, vol. 181, pp. 128-133.

 

Innes of Learney, Thomas, "The Armorial House or Family," Notes and Queries, September 2, 1939, vol. 177, pp. 164-167; September 9, 1939, vol. 177, pp. 185-189.

 

Innes of Learney, Thomas, "Armorial Tailzies in Scotland" Notes and Queries, April 13, 1940, vol. 178, pp. 254-257; April 20, 1940, vol. 178, pp. 272-275; April 27, 1940, vol. 178, pp. 292-297.

 

Innes of Learney, Thomas, "Diploma of Nobility for De Landa" 1940 Juridical Review, pp. 181-221

 

This article concerns primarily a Diploma of Nobility prepared by the Spanish kings of arms, but contains references and comparisons to birthbrieves and similar documents prepared by the Lord Lyon.

 

Innes of Learney, Thomas, "Ensigns-Armorial of Erskine of Linlathen," Notes and Queries, November 2, 1940, vol. 179, pp. 308-311.

 

Innes of Learney, Thomas, "Heraldic ‘Legitimation’", Notes and Queries, November 23, 1940, vol. 179, pp. 362-365.

 

Innes of Learney, Thomas "Lyon Office Birthbrieves" Scottish Law Review, vol. 58, no. 694, pp. 165-170 (1942).

 

Innes of Learney, Thomas, "Lyon Court Procedure" Scottish Law Review, vol. 57, no. 678, pp. 129-133 (1942)

 

Innes of Learney, Thomas, "The Nature of Armorial Bearings," Notes and Queries, May 25, 1940, vol. 178 pp. 362-367.

 

Innes of Learney, Thomas, "Processional Roll of A Scottish Armorial Funeral, stated to have been used for the Obsequies of George, 1st Marquess of Huntly, 1636" Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, vol. 77 pp. 154 - 174 (1942-43)

 

Innes of Learney, Thomas, "Robes of the Feudal Baronage of Scotland" Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, vol. 79 pp. 111-163 (1946).

 

This is a very interesting article on the design and use of robes of state by the feudal barons of Scotland. It also examines the nature and origin of the chapeaux, the currently recognized symbol of a Scottish Feudal Baron in armorial display.

 

Innes of Learney, Thomas, "The Scottish Parliament; Its Symbolism and Its Ceremonial" 1932 Juridical Review pp. 87-124

 

Innes of Learney, Thomas "The Scottish Parliament: What it was, What it was not" 1932 Juridical Review 1 - 24

 

Innes of Learney, Thomas, "Sir George Mackenzie on Armorial Succession," Notes and Queries, July 5, 1941, vol. 181 pp. 2-4.

 

Innes of Learney, Thomas, "The Style and Title of "Lord Lyon King of Arms" Juridical Review, vol. 64 (1931) pp.197-220.

 

Innes of Learney, Thomas, "Transfers of Armorial Bearings" Scottish Notes and Queries, vol. XI, 3rd series, pp. 187-189 (1933).

 

McAndrew, B.A., "The Sigillography of the Ragman Roll" Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, vol. 129, pp. 663-752 (1999)

 

Examines each of the surviving seals attached to the Ragman Roll, in an attempt to more completely identify all persons who signed or sealed the roll.  The paper indicates that some 600 of the seals are now identified.  In addition, the paper examines the heraldry found on these seals, and compares it to other sources, especially from early rolls of arms.

 

McColgan, R.A.,The Arms of the King of Scots and Selected Heraldry”, Genalogica and Heraldica: Proceedings of the 22nd International Congress of Genealogical and Heraldic Sciences in Ottawa, University of Ottawa Press, 1998 pp. 401-406 (ISBN 0-7766-0472-4)

 
The "selected heraldry" is Canadian.
 

Roads, E.A.,Scottish Heraldry Furth of Scotland”, Genalogica and Heraldica: Proceedings of the 22nd International Congress of Genealogical and Heraldic Sciences in Ottawa, University of Ottawa Press, 1998 pp.461-466 (ISBN 0-7766-0472-4)

 
A discussion of the propagation of Scots families and their arms to other portions of Europe.
 

Schweitzer, L.A., and Hunter of Montlaw, D.,Late Medieval Scottish Heraldic Design” L’identitá Genealogica e Araldica, Ministero per i Beni e le Attivitì Culturali Ufficio Centrale per i Beni Archivistici, Roma, 2000 (ISBN: 88-7125-187-3), pp 93-115

 

A paper discussing Scottish heraldic design from the 14th to 16th centuries.  It give a qualitative and quantitative analysis of tincture use, charge use, and overall heraldic composition.  This article is a companion piece to “Charge Use in Late Medieval Scots Heraldry” found in Double Tressure issue 24 (2001), which goes into greater detail about the various charges used in medieval Scots heraldry.

 

Southesk, Earl of, "Douglas, Percy and the Cavers Ensign" Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, February 10, 1902, pp 246 - 280.

 

One of two articles which contain extensive descriptions of the surviving pre-1650 Scottish standards, both as to design and as to construction. This article includes a facsimile of the standards discussed in the article.

 
 

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